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3 edition of Classification of peat and peatlands found in the catalog.

Classification of peat and peatlands

International Symposium on Classification of Peat and Peatlands (1979 HyytiaМ€laМ€, Finland)

Classification of peat and peatlands

proceedings of the International Symposium held in Hyytiälä, Finland, September 17-21, 1979

by International Symposium on Classification of Peat and Peatlands (1979 HyytiaМ€laМ€, Finland)

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by international Peat Society in Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Peat bogs -- Congresses.,
  • Peat -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementorganized by E. Kivinen, L. Heikurainen, P. Pakarinen.
    GenreCongresses.
    ContributionsKivinen, E., Heikurainen, Leo., Pakarinen, P., International Peat Society.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGB621 .I55 1979
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 367 p. :
    Number of Pages367
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3858766M
    ISBN 109519921451
    LC Control Number81178848

    variations. Taxonomic classification of the soils is presented and issues related to the classification are discussed. The summary conclusions are: 1. Morphological features a. Peatlands are generally small and thickness usually varies from 40 to cm. b. There is a thick surface root mat but root content decreases with depth. A mire, peatland or quagmire is a wetland type, dominated by living peat-forming arise because of incomplete decomposition of organic matter, usually litter from vegetation, due to water-logging and subsequent anoxia. All types of mires share the common characteristic of being saturated with water at least seasonally with actively forming peat, while having its own set of.

    Peatlands form important landscape elements in many parts of the world and play significant roles for biodiversity and global carbon balance. This new edition has been fully revised and updated, documenting the latest advances in areas such as microbial processes and relations between biological processes and hydrology. Chapters 2 to 5 of this book concentrate on ways of characterizing tropical peats so that management techniques can be matched appropriately in subsequent chapters. Because tropical peat reclamation is a relatively new field of development there is too little data and information. This needs to be put right by more research.

    The book provides a review and synthesis of boreal mire ecosystems including peat soil properties, mire hydrology, carbon and nutrient cycling, and classification of mire sites. The emphasis, however, is on peatland forests as a renewable natural resource. This book is divided into four parts that look in turn at the nature of peatland classification and terminology, hydrological and ecological processes and peatland growth, changes in peatlands and their influence on the environment, and resource management issues. Each chapter is supported by examples from all the main peatland regions and site types including New Cited by:


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Classification of peat and peatlands by International Symposium on Classification of Peat and Peatlands (1979 HyytiaМ€laМ€, Finland) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Peatlands International is sent out by email to all IPS members for free in four issues per year. The magazine consists of about pages with background reports on peat and peatlands, reviews of conferences, news items and books reviews.

It also publishes research findings, business reports and internal information on the IPS. New authors [ ]. Peatlands are referred to by various names such as bogs, fens, and mires. According to the IPS, a mire refers to a peatland where peat is actively being formed (Table ).A bog, also known as an ombrogenous mire, is raised above the surrounding landscape and receives water only from precipitation.A fen, or geogenous mire, is situated in depressions and.

The purpose of this classification is to standardize the naming of peat materials so that the peat-producer can better identify the product and the peat-consumer can better select peat materials to meet requirements.

This system may also be used for peat resource Classification of peat and peatlands book, environmental impact reports, and preliminary engineering studies. The parameters selected. This classification of Maine's freshwater organic wetlands (peatlands) uses nutrient source, geomorphic-hydrologic setting, gross topography of the.

Peat (/ p iː t /), also known as turf (/ t ɜːr f /), is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation or organic is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs. The peatland ecosystem is the most efficient carbon sink on the planet, because peatland plants capture CO 2 naturally released from the peat, maintaining an equilibrium.

Many approaches to the classification of peat-forming (mire) systems have been devised over the years, each with its own particular focus.

The present review restricts itself to those classification systems which focus on peatlands as ecosystems. Add tags for "Classification of peat and peatlands: proceedings of the International Symposium held in Hyytiälä, Finland, September".

Be the first. Similar Items. Throughout the book the interactions between organisms and environmental conditions (especially wetness, availability of oxygen, and pH) are emphasized, with chapters on the physical and chemical characteristics of peat, the role of peat as an archive of past vegetation and climate, and peatland succession and development.5/5(2).

Get this from a library. Classification of peat and peatlands: proceedings of the IPS Symposium in Glasgow, September [International Peat Society.].

A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses surveys the fens and bogs of the Upper Midwest, examining how plant life is directly affected by coldness, waterlogged peat accumulations, and habitats that become progressively more acidic and mineral poor.

Other topics explored include classification of peatlands, nutrient cycling, and the detailed taxonomy of peat mosses. The Canadian wetland classification is also presented in some detail. Crum, Howard. A focus on peatlands and peat mosses.

Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan Press. DOI: /mpub E-mail Citation» Howard Crum writes about his fascination with peatlands, including wonderful literature quotes, and his views of peatland processes and plants. Country, northern Scotland (centered on o N, o W - Fig.

2A), the largest blanket bog in Europe, to cover a spectrum of peatland conditions. Plant community classification for Kootenai National Forest peatlands. by Stephen V Cooper,W. Marc Jones,Montana Natural Heritage Program.

Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book. Rate it * You Rated it *. A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses (Great Lakes Environment) Paperback – September 3, by Howard Crum (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings.

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Cited by: Peatlands (or mires) cover at least million ha globally, of which the greater part is situated between 50° and 70° N.

Although the majority of peatlands are not used for human needs, there are large areas where agriculture, peat or wood production has been practiced. The suitability of peatlands for forestry differs from country to country depending on climatic conditions, raw.

RSPO Organic & Peat Soil Classification Announcements 08 August RSPO Peatlands Working Group 2 (PLWG-2) has adopted the common definition of ‘Histosol’ (organic soil) effective November as follows: Histosols (organic soils) are soils with cumulative organic layer(s) comprising more than half of the upper 80cm or cm of the soil.

Peatlands in their natural state are wet organic soils formed over thousands of years from plant remains, and fall under the classification of organic soils. Globally, a few definitions are applied, which differ according to the percentage of organic matter and minimum thickness of the organic layers.

Mires and Peat publishes high-quality research papers on all aspects of peatland science, technology and wise use, including: ecology, hydrology, survey, inventory, classification, functions and values of mires and peatlands; scientific, economic and human aspects of the management of peatlands for agriculture, forestry, nature conservation.

Purchase Peatlands, Volume 9 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNThe generic RSPO definition of peat soil is as follows: “Histosols (organic soils) are soils with cumulative organic layer(s) comprising more than half of the upper 80cm or cm of the soil surface containing 35% or more of organic matter (35% or more Loss on Ignition) or 18% or more organic carbon”.

The word known peat is growth on organic systems where the plant growth is fast, but soils are defined as a partially decomposed organic matter deposit due to poor aeration and low temperature grades [].Peat is also named as turf and turba in different literatures owing to its unique property to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or : Bülent Topcuoğlu, Metin Turan.Abstract.

Limnic materials (post-glacial lake sediments) were observed to underlie a significant portion of the peatlands of Minnesota. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the properties of these materials that are important in characterizing them as soil materials.Already the first scientific book on peatlands (Schoockius ) contained a chapter on restoration.

Yet, only now there is a rising awareness of the necessity to conserve and restore mires and peatlands in order to avoid adverse environmental and economic effects.